www.ccel.org, Introduction to the Vision of Paul
'St. Augustine laughed at it in his treatise on John' and Ælfric 'condemned it as a "false narrative"'. (T.A. Shippey, Poems of Wisdom and Learning in Old English, pg. 31)
'The Revelation of Paul was known to S. Augustine, who thus refers to it in his Tractate 98 on the Gospel of John, 8: "... There have been some vain individuals, who, with a presumption that betrays the grossest folly, have forged a Revelation of Paul, crammed with all manner of fables, which has been rejected by the Orthodox Church; affirming it to be that whereof he had said that he was caught up into the third heavens, and there heard unspeakable words `which it is not lawful for a man to utter.' Nevertheless, the audacity of such might be tolerable, had he said that he heard words which it is not as yet lawful for a man to utter; but when he said `which it is not lawful for a man to utter, 'who are they that dare to utter them with such impudence and non-success? " ' (from www.ccel.org, Introduction to the Vision of Paul)
T.A. Shippey, Poems of Wisdom and Learning in Old English, pg. 31
i.e. in the description of the Last Judgement (see Hugh Thomas Keenan, Apocalyptic Vision in Old English Poetry, pg. 60)
The Visio Pauli 'contains, for example, the twenty-four elders, the golden thrones and crowns, the New Jerusalem, and the holy river.' (see Hugh Thomas Keenan, Apocalyptic Vision in Old English Poetry, pg. 60)
www.ccel.org, Introduction to the Vision of Paul